Are we looking in the right place?
 

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arydberg

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Are we looking in the right place?
« on: August 06, 2015, 12:45:06 PM »
Is there any interest in this report that many people witnesses a plane at low altitude on the morning flowing the disappearance over the Maldives islands.     Along with this is the displeasure of the families of the victims  who feel something is wrong.     It all reminds me of TWA 800 where many eyewitness that saw a missile were  totally discounted.   

see:   
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/04/04/mh370-maldives-islanders-low-flying-missing-malaysia-airlines-flight_n_7003406.html



Gotha229

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2015, 08:16:04 PM »
Aside from outside the flight profile the time zone differences mean their sighting was about an hour after it's end of flight.

takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 03:23:36 AM »
http://i1210.photobucket.com/albums/cc408/takso/MH370FlightRoute.jpg

http://i1210.photobucket.com/albums/cc408/takso/MH370EndedSite-1.png

MH370 can be found here, seriously..

I wish to share my view here on what has truly happened to the flight MH370 on 8th March 2014: -

1. It was started off neither by mechanical fault, hijack nor suicide.  Or may I quote an unprecedented event has taken place that has led to a catastrophic mechanical failure on that ill-fated plane.

2. Simply, the plane was just at the wrong place, but at the right time and right condition.  It was merely a natural tragedy that has taken place.

3. The plane was hit by a meteorite at a flash speed force that flared up the cockpit.  A rapid decompression has taken place at the cockpit, initially.  The fortified cockpit door has temporarily prevented decompression from taking place in the cabin with passengers.  The pilot(s) tried miserably to control and salvage the plane, setting a new direction and switching on autopilot mode.

4. A few seconds later, an explosive cabin decompression set in due to the vast air pressure differences at high altitude with a thundering sound (when the plane climbed to 47,000 feet).  The fire at the cockpit was instantly blown off (imaging to open up a champagne bottle).  A heavy fog immediately filled the cabin interior as the relative humidity of cabin air changed as the air cooled and condensed.

5.  All crews and passengers were presumably to have passed out or been dead during the time of explosive cabin decompression.  There was a scene of absolute silence that filled in the cabin and the cockpit.

6.  On an autopilot mode, the plane continued to cruise below 30,000 feet and circulate the Indian Ocean based on the pre-setting engaged by the pilot before his last breath.  In fact, the pilot has performed a superbly professional job during a dire emergency by setting the plane to circulate around the least populated area such as the vast Indian Ocean rather than above someone else’s house.  This was probably attributed to his deep interest and vast experiences gained through his constant in-house flight simulating practices as well as his rational response upon knowing the slim chance of landing the troubled plane himself after losing all the possible communication with the ground control tower.

7.  The plane adjusted itself automatically based on the pre-setting parameters and continued to cruise at a much lower altitude (i.e. closing to a plane landing altitude), thus evading all the radar detection in the surrounding countries.  In fact, the plane did pass through the Andaman Islands and up until the Maldives southern tip islands before turning back in a circular route as shown in the Google map attachment.

8.  The plane finally ended in the Indian Ocean due to out of fuel tentatively at the spot indicated on the attached Google map with coordinates: - 7.321795, 97.778432 i.e. north-eastern of Cocos (Keeling) Islands or south-western of Sumatera Island.  There was a high chance that the plane glided into the ocean with very minimal debris remaining on the water surface.  In other words, the plane may well be staying afloat at the 5th arc (instead of the 7th arc) of the Inmarsat’s satellite reading and continued to transmit the electronic ‘ping’ signal for some two more hours before finally sinking into the bottom of the ocean.

9.  At the end of the day, it was neither the pilot’s fault, nor the MAS’s fault, nor the Boeing’s fault.  Nobody and nothing were at fault.  It was merely a pure natural tragedy – the plane being at a wrong place, but at a right time and condition.

10.  Last but not least, I truly hope the relevant authorities or governments could refocus the search area in the Indian Ocean into the above mentioned coordinates. 

« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 03:31:10 AM by takso »

Admin

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2016, 09:44:40 AM »
While I appreciate you taking your time to share your theory, I refer you to:

Quote
Rules of Conduct:
1. These forums are for discussing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (“MH370” and/or “MAS370”), aviation accidents, and aviation related topics. Conspiracy theories or theories defying reason, logic, or current understanding will not be entertained.

It's clear from your post that you are not in the industry and do not have a working understanding of cockpit automation. While it may be an interesting read, it is most certainly within the realm of defying reason, logic, and understanding of aircraft and aircraft systems. You do have a talent for storytelling though :)
Founder of MH370 Discussion Forum and Wiki

takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2016, 05:46:44 PM »
No worries, let's see...time will tell who's correct or otherwise  8)

takso

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Gotha229

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2016, 03:35:18 AM »
Really the Huffington post??? - check out timelines and Inmarsat data and time zones and the end of flight and that will be your answer.  TWA800 was a totally different "as it happened" real time event. The  Maldives village people were jut up from a siesta and Maldives Airlines operates from A320's to Twin Otters from a close airport. There are so many other variables that negate anything. Read through the posts and thal shalt find. 


AmosBe2

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2016, 07:34:56 AM »
At this point in time, the question, Are we looking in the right place? has a lot of relivance now, as there is talk the  Australian government will end it's search for MH 370 in June this year.
Due to evidence from the media since the 26 June 2014, I have had this hypothisis that the search seemed to be in the wrong place, a view I sheared with the Australian Government in Oct 2014. At that time the search was in it's infancy, and when I received a negative reply I thought it best to see what transpired. Nothing has transpired, so I'm airing this condensed hypothisis in this forum to see peoples views.
 
                                   MH 370 The Alternate Last Route   
When flight MH370 went missing on the 8 March 2014 and the subsequent tracking of it into the Indian Ocean, raised many questions, a couple of which were, who was in charge of the plane and why did it go in the direction it did.                                     
 However on the 26 June 2014, an important bit of evidence was reported in the media that Captain Zahari Ahmad Shah had plotted and erased a flight path on his flight simulator that was to fly to a remote Southern Indian Ocean island, and do simulated landings on it. To my knowledge the Malaysian Government have never said if they knew what Island it was, do they know and hushed it up? Or did they not find it significant enough? But what ever the case it answered the question of why  flight MH 370 went in that direction, and who the number one person was responsible for the loss of 239 people onboard. We now know, Captain Zahari Ahmad Shah  was a dissident and unhappy with his government over a number of issues, one of which was the treatment given to Anwar Ibrahim, whom he had met. So he was obviously obsessed on that course of action, he wanted to give his government and humanity a good shake up, and once the plane deviated from its official course there was no turning back, he was doomed. He knew he couldn’t land on an Island in the Southern Indian Ocean; there just isn’t one with that length of runway needed to land a 777, so it was a one way trip, but it is possible that by picking an island, it would have some sort of significance for him.
 As is known the Southern Indian Ocean is a remote and inhospitable place, but  there is one island there, that MH 370 could have reached, or have come within reach of, with the available fuel on board. That  island is Amsterdam Island which has the coordinates 37.49’S-77.33’E  and is virtually at the same distance away from Banda Aceh as the last satellite handshake was at 8:11am on 9 March 2014, both Island and last handshake time are virtually on the same latitude 40 degrees South and roughly a thousand miles apart. All the search areas thus far have been around the estimated last handshake point, which is roughly 1000mls from Amsterdam Island. So here we have a situation where a pilot plotted to fly to an island into the Southern Indian Ocean on his flight simulator, then a couple of months later the plane he’s flying diverts to the same area, and the last calculated scheduled satellite handshake position is at the same latitude as Amsterdam Island but a thousand miles away. That may seem a long distance apart, but in the vastness of the Southern Indian Ocean is it that  distant.                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Amsterdam Island  lies virtually mid way between Australia and South Africa and in the middle of the Indian Ocean, and would be the furthest point from any land mass, these facts were obviously not lost on the pilot. So if he wanted to go to the furthest place from civilization, with the fuel available, Amsterdam Island fits the bill. As pointed out before, he must have been obsessed, so trying to fathom his mind with logic or rational is a task, but in light of the above revelations doesn’t it seem too much of a coincidence that he went in that direction but didn’t head for that island.
I put this hypothesis to the Australian Government in October 2014, and was subsequently advised by the Hon. Warren Truss to look at the search area in the JACC report of that date, which I had already done, before sending my letter.

To date the area searched has been based on the last satellite handshake, and nothing has been found, that is not to diminish anybodies efforts to find the aircraft, but are we putting too much reliance on this data? wouldn’t it now be prudent to search around  Amsterdam Island at least an area around where the flight path from Banda Aceh to  Amsterdam Island intersects with the latitude arc of the last satellite handshake, and surely it would have been prudent, to have searched for aircraft parts all over the island. I am aware Amsterdam Island is owned by the French and there is a research station there.

 

takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2016, 06:04:31 AM »


To locate the whereabouts of MH370, we have to understand the Indian Ocean current flow.

TheHumanFactor

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2016, 07:04:05 AM »
All well and good, but that's not a theory. We know that the aircraft was heading in that direction, so I'm not even sure what you are suggesting. That the aircraft flew further west? That doesn't correlate well with the BTO/BFO data. How would you reconcile that? The nature of the last ping was a log-on sequence which indicates that the aircraft was running out of fuel, hence the importance of searching around the 7th arc.

Drift modeling wouldn't be much different from that location either.

Where's the evidence? I'm not sure I see any value in this. The FBI found nothing of interest on his flight simulator - http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/04/no-clues-to-missing-malaysia-airlines-plane-in-captains-flight-simulator/.

takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2016, 10:45:58 AM »
Currently, the plane debris were found in southwest of Indian Ocean.  The current claims that MH370 was likely ended in the far edge of southeast might not be correct after all.  If it was factual, the debris should then be found in the Southern Ocean instead after 2 or more years later.

Therefore, based on the typical ocean flow worldwide, it was most likely that MH370 ended in northeast of Indian Ocean.  And after a lapse of 2 years, there was a high probability of debris being discovered in southwest region as per the Indian Ocean current flow displayed.

Moreover, the recent deep sea earthquake nearby the northeast region might have shaken up lots of debris embedded in the deep ocean floor and subsequently moved it into the ocean surface.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2016, 10:54:46 AM by takso »

AmosBe2

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2016, 09:45:07 AM »
If takso's post  is a reply to mine, I will repeat what I said. Amsterdam Island is virtually on the same latitude as the last satellite communication at 08:11, about 1000 miles away. I am no expert and have to rely on books and the net for my info, and the charts of the Indian Ocean, and the Indian Ocean gyre indicate  that debris found so far could just as well come from around Amsterdam Island, as of the last
communication. Could you explain the relevance of this quote "Therefore, based on the typical ocean flow worldwide:when we are dealing with just the Indian Ocean. 

In reply to The Human Factor, what I'm saying is Captain Shah plotted a course on his flight sim to fly into the Southern Indian Ocean and land a plane on an Island. That in light of future events to me is highly significant, please see the news item of the 22 June 2014 attached,  which is one of many from that date and is later news than your example which highlights the misinformation in the early months ie.

" They (FBI analysts) have finished with the simulator. There is nothing suspicious whatsoever about what they found," a senior U.S. official told ABC News.

"There's nothing at all (criminal) about the pilot. Right now there is zero evidence of a criminal act by the flight crew," the official said.

The Captains flight sim plan and what direction  he went, is at the crux of my hypothisis, that the BTO/BFO data didn't correlate with this made me a bit sceptical initially and as i said I have waited to see what turned up, but only a piece of the plane nowhere near the estimated last contact point is the only thing. To date the search area has been based around the BTO/BFO data that was great, but with the vast area covered in the search that surely means one of two things, either we're looking in the wrong direction or we've missed it, what do you think? Has drift modeling ever been done for Amsterdam Island? I doubt it,as I pointed out,it should have at least been searched for debris. It is evident the Australian Government have come to a point were the whole project  needs a rethink, they are going to stop searching in June.                 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/malaysia/10917868/MH370-captain-plotted-route-to-southern-Indian-Ocean-on-home-simulator.html
« Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 10:03:46 AM by AmosBe2 »

takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2016, 11:43:46 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-22487285

Historical facts have shown that debris from the Japan Tsunami 2011 have drifted into Canada after a lapse of 2 years.  This is in line with the map of ocean current flow worldwide as shared in my post earlier. In other words, ocean debris would not stay in one localised area for a long duration.  It would drift and drift all way round in tandem with the ocean current flow worldwide.


takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2016, 03:48:07 AM »


takso

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Re: Are we looking in the right place?
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2016, 05:04:13 AM »


We assume that the arc distance for the ocean surface debris movement from South Indian Ocean to Reunion Island would be around 8,000 km.  If we were to compare it with the Japan Tsunami case, the debris movement from Sendai, Japan to Flores Island, Canada would take an arc distance of around 7,250 km.  The estimated drifting time was estimated around 26 months (2 years + 2 months) as per the article in the reported news.

In other words, for an arc distance of 8,000 km, the drifting time should take around 29 months (2 years + 5 months).  At present, the incidence of MH370 was in March 2014 and the 1st debris was discovered in July 2015 (merely 1 year + 4 months later).  Furthermore, this assumption was based on the drifting of debris on the ocean surface and for a deep ocean debris movement, it would definitely take much longer time perhaps 3 to 4 years to cover the same distance.   

Right now, let's assume that it was an ocean surface debris for MH370.  An arc distance of approximately 4,900 km from an area nearby Cocos Island to Reunion Island would then take approximately 17-18 months (1 year +5-6 months) of debris drifting time.  This estimation would nearly match the lapse of time taken for the actual 1st debris discovery.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2016, 05:19:09 AM by takso »